Established 1885

The Washburn Review

Established 1885

The Washburn Review

Established 1885

The Washburn Review

Eric Grospitch kicks off First-Gen Fridays

First-Generation+invites+Eric+Grospitch%2C+vice+president+of+Student+Life%2C+as+a+speaker+to+open+the+semester.+Grospitch+spoke+about+how+his+experiences+in+college+advanced+his+career.
Graphic courtesy of Jenny Lieurance
First-Generation invites Eric Grospitch, vice president of Student Life, as a speaker to open the semester. Grospitch spoke about how his experiences in college advanced his career.

On Feb. 2, Eric Grospitch, vice president of Student Life, kicked off the First-Generation Friday meetings for the spring 2024 semester as a guest speaker.

Jenny Lieurance, First-Generation specialist, invited Grospitch to share his experience as a first generation college student and how other first-generation students can navigate their career path.

“I didn’t even know that I was first-gen,” Grospitch said.

Grospitch said his dad gave him the option of “either going to college or joining the military,” and with that, he decided to get a degree. Grospitch received his bachelor’s degree in business and his master’s degree in counseling at Fort Hays State University. After working for a small amount of time, he attended the University of Kansas City, Missouri, where he received his doctorate of education.

He pursued his career and worked a variety of jobs until he ended up at Washburn University. Now, as a parent, he gave his kids the same two options of college or the military, and both took to the books.

Grospitch mentioned that the most important thing a student can do to give themselves the highest chance of success is to “find your person.” Whether it be a professor, academic advisor or a librarian, finding someone to be curious with opens a student’s avenues to knowledge that they never would have known. He also stressed that there are no bad questions, it is always helpful to expand your knowledge.

After his speech, Grospitch opened the floor to questions. When the question, “How can students make change on campus?” was asked, he jumped right on it.

Grospitch said that WSGA is the formal way to go. But, it also helps students to keep everyone in the loop. If students are complaining about a problem on campus, nothing will be done about it if no one speaks up.

Grospitch wrapped up his speech by inviting everyone to share their troubles with a staff member and go out and “find their person.”

The next first-gen meeting will be March 1, 2024 in Mabee Library.

Edited by Morgan Albrecht and Jayme Thompson

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Jeremy Ford, Copy Chief
Hello! I am a sophomore mass media major with a concentration in journalism. I write all kinds of stories, but I enjoy writing about sports the most. I hope to find a career in sports media of some kind, so this position is right up my alley.
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