Established 1885

The Washburn Review

Established 1885

The Washburn Review

Established 1885

The Washburn Review

Jobs for all: Students look at the pros and cons of working on campus versus off campus

Both+on-campus+and+off-campus+jobs+have+their+own+respective+benefits.+It%E2%80%99s+up+to+the+student+to+decide+which+position+better+suits+their+situation.
Jeremy Ford
Both on-campus and off-campus jobs have their own respective benefits. It’s up to the student to decide which position better suits their situation.

College isn’t cheap, there’s no doubt about it. However working at McDonald’s five days a week may not be the best way to gain field knowledge. So where’s the balance between earnings and experience?

Washburn University and Topeka both offer an immense variety of working positions that are suitable for any college student. Each type of job has its pros and cons that can help students with paying the bills or gaining valuable knowledge towards their future career. James Barraclough, the director for undergraduate initiatives, is gungho about student positions on campus.

“There are all kinds of jobs on campus that offer amazing student benefits,” Barraclough said.

Barraclough also mentioned that all student positions can be found online on the mywashburn.edu job page as well as at the career services office on the east end of Morgan Hall.

These kinds of jobs include but are not limited to: front office workers for several different buildings, gameday staff, social media interns, student coordinators and tutors for differentsubjects.

Mia Albert, a senior political science and communication studies major, works as a student ambassador and office assistant for enrollment management in the Admissions Office. As an ambassador, Albert gives tours to prospective students. She also completes general office tasks such as folding T-shirts, filing paperwork and restocking supplies.

“I like the flexibility of the job and the people I get to work with,” Albert said.

Barraclough encourages students to work on campus for that very reason: the flexibility. The employers are well aware that the employee is a student first and are “more understanding than other employers,” according to Barraclough. This way students can focus on homework and exams first and then work their hours second.

Although on-campus jobs offer great opportunities, they can be restrictive for some students.

“The limit on only working 20 hours a week is sometimes a struggle,” Albert said.

Another boundary for on-campus jobs is their wage. Pay for student positions is usually less than $15. According to ziprecruiter.com, the average hourly pay in Topeka, Kansas, is between $14-$24.

Working off campus won’t always promise higher wages, but these positions offer more weekly hours to work. They also can offer the student good quality work experience and even some useful internships that correlate with the student’s major. However, off-campus jobs require a commute of varying lengths, so some may struggle or have to pay more in gas and car fees if their workplace is farther than walking distance.

While some students prefer staying on campus, other students, such as junior physical therapy assistant major Maggie Hansen, enjoy their position away from the university.

“I work as an independent home health aid,” Hansen said. “I help a physically disabled woman in Topeka by doing home therapy, helping her around the house and running errands with her.”

Hansen has worked as a home health aid for almost a year and stated that she enjoys her job because of how closely tied it is to her major.

“I get to learn more about my profession as well as going to different appointments to learn about her disability. I know that I have an amazing friendship with my employer and I will have this friendship for the rest of my life,” Hansen said.

Just like many other students in the medical field, Hansen has a schedule packed full of studying, testing and clinicals. Although she is very busy, having the job helps keep her organized and accountable. Hansen stated that it has been a challenge balancing her work, school and social life, but it has taught her to be more responsible and exposed her to how the real world works after college.

Hansen and Albert are just two of many students who have to work while attending classes during the semester to meet their wants and needs. Hundreds of students across Washburn University are actively looking for positions and several jobs are being added on and off campus constantly.

Edited by Jayme Thompson and Aja Carter

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About the Contributor
Jeremy Ford, Copy Chief
Hello! I am a sophomore mass media major with a concentration in journalism. I write all kinds of stories, but I enjoy writing about sports the most. I hope to find a career in sports media of some kind, so this position is right up my alley.
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